Archive for August, 2014

Memorial Ceremony for Major General Harold J. Greene, 13 August 2014

August 13, 2014

Reflections and images from today’s memorial service for Major General Greene. While the senior speakers Secretary of the Army and Chief of Staff ofthe Army and others were eloquently sincere and expressed fine and endearing remarks about the life and profession of MG Greene, I would like to honor Harry Greene by relaying what I saw there in the auditorium attended by more than 300 people. A dark sober stage framed by dark blue curtains and empty except the podium composed of a single focal point of the soldier’s helmet capping an upturned rifle pointed downwards. A set of identification tags hangs loose above an empty set of tan combat boots. To the right in the place of honor is the flag of the United States of America and to the left – the flag of the US Army with all 183 battle streamers and immediately below a rolled general officer’s black leather belt with gold buckle (note left and right from the podiums view). The podium is covered with the bright red of a general officers flag and the brilliant white of the two stars signifying a Major General. MG Greene’s framed photograph rests alone upon this podium.

I think commemorative words are often lost on attendees but the images, music and ceremony of paying respect and saying goodbye always remains. Following commemorative remarks praising the general and recognizing his many significant contributions to the US Army, our nation, and his role as Deputy Commander of the Combined Security Transition Command – Afghanistan; the Pentagon Choir offered special music “You raise Me Up.” Pentagon Chaplain, COL Rutherford followed the special music with the benediction. The Chaplains’ remarks were brief and focused that “we come here today out of gratitude” and provided solace that “the just man who dies early will be at rest.” Following the benediction, the Command Sergeant Major approached the podium, turned and called out roll call. The first two names called were answered immediately from within the auditorium as “here!’ However, when the Command Sergeant Major called out for “Major General Greene,” only silence was heard. The Command Sergeant Major called again for “Major General Harold Greene,” and again only silence. The Command Sergeant Major called a third time for “Major General Harold Joseph Greene,” and was met with only silence for a last time. He then solemnly turned and slowly saluted. It was at this point with memorial ceremony almost complete that the lone bugler came onto stage out of the dark and rendered taps.

Taps in the auditorium was eerily beautiful within such a totally quite place and had a slight echo within the walls. As taps played, one could only focus on the source of light: the helmet, upturned rifle and empty boots that dominated the hall. The last image I can offer is that of the Secretary of the Army and Chief of Staff of the Army approaching the podium and rendering their slow and solemn final salutes of farewell. The family of MG Greene, senior Army and Acquisition leaders and all other friends, associates and colleague then filed by and offered their own solemn gestures of farewell. Some slowly saluted, MG Greene’s son and daughter each raised their hand and touched the two stars on his combat helmet, and others made other small gestures of respect and farewell. As each of the more than 300 persons attending made their way past the podium, the memorial service came to a solemn end.

 

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Funeral Service for MG Harold J. Greene

August 13, 2014

arlington cemetery

Funeral Service for Major General Harold J. Greene, Former Deputy Commanding General, Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan, will be held on Thursday, 14 August 2014, at 1500 hours at Memorial Chapel, Fort Myer, Virginia.  Interment with Full Military Honors to follow at Arlington National Cemetery.  

A valid government identification is required to gain access to Fort Myer. Recommend attendees allow extra time for processing through security if you decide to drive directly to Fort Myer.  Military Police will be on hand to assist.

The Uniform is Service Dress with Service Cap and Civilian Informal.

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.mil/Plan-Your-Visit/Getting-Here/Directions

A little Review: Differences between Buy America Act and Berry Amendment

August 8, 2014

PEOsoldier_ArmyCombatShirt

Photo PEO Soldier, US Army

I know its a thoroughly discussed subject but sometimes it’s good to go back to the source and review – just exactly what are the differences between Buy America Act (BAA) and Berry Amendment? 

The Berry Amendment applies to the Department of Defense (DoD) and covers procurement of Clothing,Tents, tarps, and covers,Cotton and other natural fiber products, Woven silk blends, Spun silk yarn for cartridge cloth,Synthetic fabric and coated synthetic fabric,Canvas products, Wool: wool fiber, wool yarn and wool in fabrics, materials or manufactured articles, and items of individual equipment (FSC 8465) containing covered fibers, yarns, fabrics or material. There are five important exceptions to this law (1) Incidental incorporation, (2) Chemical warfare protective clothing from qualifying country, (3) Cotton & wool waste or byproducts for propellants & explosives, (4) Fibers and yarns in synthetic & coated synthetic fabrics for non-textile products: examples include fibers in circuit cards and fibers in SAPI plates, and (5) Para-aramid fibers & yarns (from qualifying countries only).

The Berry Amendment is specific to  DoD procurement where the BAA applies to all federal agencies (the Berry Amendment is IN ADDITION TO the BAA). 

Photo PEO Soldier US Army – MOLLE Pack

Berry Amendment and BAA Differences

  1. Berry is DoD specific, BAA is government-wide
  2. Berry specifies covered items, BAA covers supply purchases
  3. Berry Amendment applies over the Simplified Acquisition Threshold ($150,000), while Buy American Act applies over the micropurchase threshold ($2,500)
  4. Berry requires 100% domestic content, BAA requires 50% domestic content
  5. Berry Amendment has no commercial exceptions for food, textiles, or hand or measuring tools, BAA has exception for commercial information technology
  6. For Berry, qualifying country exceptions exist for chemical warfare protective clothing (all qualifying countries) and   (Netherlands only). For BAA, the qualifying country exception applies to all purchases
  7. Berry applies for contracts performed worldwide, BAA applies to U.S. only
  8. Berry has no contractor certification requirement

Key take aways are that the Buy American Act compliance does not equal Berry Amendmentcompliance and that both laws apply to DoD but Berry is more restrictive.  For more information on which countries fall within the BAA please see DFARS 225.003 for details. Partial list follows as: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, France, Greece, Israel, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden,Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

THE FINE PRINT – the Berry Amendment (10 U.S.C. 2533a), covers textiles, food and hand or measuring tools. Specialty metals are no longer part of this law. Specialty metals are restricted under Section 842 of the FY2007 NDAA. You can find all the details as implemented through the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) at Subpart 225.7002. The contract clauses that apply to the acquisition of the items listed in A.1., above, are DFARS 252.225-7012 and DFARS 252.225-7015 You can also find policy on the Berry Amendment in Procedures, Guidance and Information (PGI) 225-70.  For more information on Defense Procurement and Policy (DPAP) please visit http://www.acq.osd.mil/dpap/cpic/ic/berry_amendment_faq.html